Tag Archives: reviews

Looking for Reviewers

Everyone knows that reviews help authors out a lot.  I am looking for people to review my newest book, Goandria: Visions of War.  I can set you up with a free copy if you are interested, all I ask is that you commit to writing a review within eight weeks of receiving the book.  Also, if you are interested in reviewing the prequel Goandria: The Schism that would be a big help too.  Just send me an email at goandria@outlook.com or leave a comment on this post.

If you want more information here is the official description: (You can also get more information on my website)

Aron, an Archris Knight of the Republics, returns home from the battlefield only to find himself plunged back into the war.  A new darkness threatens to upset the fragile peace of Goandria. The world’s hope lies in a small band’s ability to unite, despite their differing races and beliefs, to protect their homelands against the rising monster, Zontose, who now declares himself god-king of Goandria.

Powerless to aid the warriors, a young girl’s visions of possible futures bring both hope and despair. The fate of Goandria might depend on what she sees, but she doesn’t know who to trust

Hard Lessons

It is commonly said, “You cannot please everyone.” Writers know this too. We know that no matter the quality of something, someone will pick it apart. Someone will think the product is trash and does not deserve to be published.Sometimes this attitude comes from genuine critiques. The truth is, we are imperfect people that create imperfect works. The hope for a writer is to produce something that is as close to perfect as possible. Human bias also plays a big role. I do not understand book reviews from people who admit “I typically do not read this genre, and I did not like this book.” Or something along those lines. If you do not like a genre (and subsequently the book), then why bother writing a review?

I intellectually knew that there would be people that are impossible to please when I released my stuff to the world. There are going to be people who do not understand why I include certain elements and exclude others. A great example would be including a modern-like dialect in Goandria that uses medieval technology. I have talked about this here in great depth. Often people assume that fantasy has to include certain things, one of which is more formal dialogue. Why is that? If a book in a certain genre does not fit the clichés for that genre, it is called out. If the book follows the clichés of that genre, it is called out for being too cliché. I find it fascinating that people cry out for something different, but when they get it, they complain. This goes back to my original thought. You cannot please everyone because people are often difficult to please.

I am finding that since I cannot please everyone, I take constructive criticism very seriously, but I leave the rest be, and I suggest that other aspiring writers do the same.